Angola Cunene-Namib, Lubango

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Cunene-Namib, Lubango


Quick Overview

Tourists frequent campsites or lodges in Epupa which offer water sports on the river including rafting and canoeing. There are ancient baobab trees alongside the gorge, and there is an attractive and well-kept viewpoint high above the village and falls, but both are spoiled by broken bottles and abundant garbage.

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Cunene River Border with Namibia

The Cunene River (Portuguese spelling) or Kunene River (Namibian spelling) is a river in Southern Africa. It flows from the Angola highlands south to the border with Namibia. It then flows west along the border until it reaches the Atlantic Ocean. It is one of the few perennial rivers in the region. It is about 1,050 kilometres (652 mi) long, with a drainage basin 106,560 square kilometres (41,143 sq mi) in area. Its mean annual discharge is 174 m³/s (6,145 cfs) at its mouth.[1] The Epupa Falls lie on the river. Olushandja Dam dams a tributary of the river, the Etaka, and helps provide the Ruacana Power Station with water.

Caprivi

  • In the far north of Namibia, the Caprivi region provides a stunning contrast to the rest of this arid country.
  • Bordered by Angola, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Botswana this strip of land is transformed into verdant paradise washed by waters of four great perennial African rivers – the Kwando, Kavango, Chobe and the mighty Zambezi.

The walk will take you past the calm waters before the dramatic falls where the Himba people often come to wash their clothes, bathe, or play in the water. Finally, you will be taken to the best lookouts of the falls further downstream. The falls are a total of 700 meter long with a height of 35 meters, including rapids. Depending on the season, the falls have a typical flow from 20 (winter) to 800 m3 (summer) of water per second.

Cristo Rei, Lubango, Angola

The Christ the King statue (Portuguese: Cristo Rei) is a Catholic monument and shrine overlooking the city of Lubango in the South of Angola. It was inspired by the Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), as one of only four in the world. This 30 metre high white marble statue was built in 1957.
The monument was designed in the 50s by Portuguese engineer of Madeira Frazão Sardinha, and is listed as an Angolan World Heritage Site as of April 18, 2014.

Animals

While many of the big game were sadly killed during the independence war, particularly elephants, rhinos, and hippos, these charismatic creatures, including the fascinating desert elephants, are slowly returning to the region. Other animals include kudu, zebra, baboons, black-faced impala, crocodiles, and porcupines. The Kunene River also enjoys a rich bird life.

Plants

Flora typical for the region includes the makalani palm trees as well as focus and anna trees, mopanis, boababs, and maroelas. Endemic plants include the kaoko kobas, the Kunene black thorn, slender corkwood and brown-stem corkwood which have traditionally been used for magic medicine by the locals. The trumpet thorn and the purple-pod terminalia are also found in the region, as is the famous hoodia plant, which has become a popular slimming remedy in recent years and has been used for centuries by the Bushmen to suppress hunger.

The waters of Africa’s mighty Zambezi River plunge over the sheer edge of a mile-wide basalt chasm with a continuous, indescribable roar as they dramatically fall one hundred metres at a rate of 3000 tonnes per second. This is the spectacular Victoria Falls, the largest sheet of falling water in the world, one of the Seven Wonders of the Natural World and a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Rafting

For those of our guests who want more than just to gaze at the river, we offer half-day and full-day rafting or canoeing trips down the gentle Kunene River.

View of Africa

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